An update on the reMarkable paper tablet

In April I wrote down my impressions on the reMarkable Paper Tablet. This is  an update to that post.

How much did I use it?
For some time, I have used it a lot.But after getting a Microsoft Surface Pro 3 tablet,1 my use the reMarkable
dwindeled as that Surface was just a lot more convenient for what I did at the time.2 Unfortunately, the Surface started to suffer from “ghost touch” issues, which – while I still like to do stuff with the pen on it – has made me use the reMarkable more again, with the Surface serving as a laptop replacement.3

Continue reading “An update on the reMarkable paper tablet”

  1. Because it turned out that using the recommended tools (mostly Citavi and Microsoft Office) for university can make life easier, especially as I spend my workdays in Microsoft Word anyway. []
  2. Marking up PDFs with colors is sometimes more useful than doing it in black and white. []
  3. Mostly in portrait mode with a ThinkPad USB keyboard attached, which is tremendously great for text writing and editing. Everybody should try this. []

The Nook Glowlight 3

Another post on a device featuring an eInk screen, how likely is that? I honestly don’t know, but this is another post about such a thing.

I have been an avid buyer of the devices US book giant Barnes & Noble has made under the Nook brand since 2012, when I purchased a Nook Simple Touch. Than, in 2015 (?) I upgraded to a Nook Glowlight Plus which I unfortunately broke a couple weeks ago. Recently, I purchased the latest iteration of Barnes & Noble’s 6″ eInk product: The Nook Glowlight 3.

Continue reading “The Nook Glowlight 3”

a reMarkable paper tablet

I am late on this one, as I could have written about this way earlier. But I neglected to do so because it seemed to be just another good idea that will not work out—neither in the market place, nor technologically.

After this dark precursor on a very white device, the reMarkable paper tablet, let me start by pointing out that this is a device that comes close to fulfill my “Digital Assistant” “vision” I uttered in late 2009. In fact, it is the device that comes the closest of the countless devices I had for brief intervals of time (* = still have it): Continue reading “a reMarkable paper tablet”

Earl, the Back-Country Android Tablet With a 6″ E-ink Screen

Sometimes you happen to stumble on products you have been waiting for. Today, this happened to me once again. In fact, if I hadn’t been so busy lately because of an exam (which went well, as far as I can tell), I might just have written a post asking why there are no E-Ink tablets or at least eReaders with a dual core chip and Android. Why? Well, eInk is great,1 and my Nook Simple Touch is not only an eReader to me, it also serves as a simple Android tablet from time to time, as it is light and super portable (in comparison to iPad) and has a pretty decent battery life. But the Nook Simple Touch is still on “Eclair” or Android 2.1 (which runs nicely with the 600MHz ARMv7 and 256MB, but it’s getting really old). And until I read this post at “The Digital Reader” the only hope for a slightly better eInk-Tablet was the Tolino Shine, which ships with Android 2.3 and a higher-res eInk screen.

Now, as I write this, there is hope for such a product which can be significantly faster. But head over to “The Digital Reader” and read the facts yourselves.

SOURCE: http://www.the-digital-reader.com/2013/05/08/meet-earl-the-back-country-android-tablet-with-a-6-e-ink-screen/

  1. I really like the black and white look… []