Servo & Blink

The world, back in late march, knew 3-4 popular browser engines: WebKit, the engine that once was created by Apple (based on KDEs1 KHTML&KJS) and picked up by Google for their own Chrome browser2, Mozillas’ Gecko3, and Microsofts engine for (mobile) IE104. The fourth one, for the curious ones, would be Opera Softwares ‘Presto’, which Opera is replacing by WebKit in order to achieve better rendering, especially of mobile Webpages, where Apples mobile Safari alone has a huge market share.
Now, as of April 6th, there are 2 more entries to the list.
Continue reading “Servo & Blink”

  1. the Linux Desktop K Desktop Environment. []
  2. and Chrome OS plus the open source development projects dubbed Chromium & Chromium OS []
  3. developed based on open sourced Netscape Code, and used for Firefox and Mozillas new mobile OS Firefox OS []
  4. Microsoft Internet Explorer, often confused with ‘the internet’. []

Geeksphone Keon and Peak are the first Firefox OS developer phones you can actually purchase

Geeksphone Keon, Peak

Geeksphone, known for their open Android phones called “One” and “Zero”, is no more in the Android market, but have released the first two Firefox OS developer phones.

Both look nice, but aren’t exactly high-end devices, in fact, with only 512 MB RAM (and as they are build with Qualcomm’s SoCs, this means even less RAM for application) and thus not too interesting.

Ubuntu – soon on your mobile phone

Ubuntu – soon on your mobile phone

On iPad. And tablets in general.

This weekend I finally decided to de-jailbreak my iPad 2 and get iOS 6 onto it. A dumb idea, as it turns out, as this de-jailbreaking makes the iPad even more inconvenient. It’s not that the Jailbreak made it so much better, but it offered a few features like the “Quick Settings” in the Notification area, that are really missing once you have ever had them. (In fact, I miss them even more, as I disabled 3G before flashing using these settings, and now can’t enable it again).

Lately, I like my hacked Nook Simple Touch a lot more as a tablet than my iPad. It’s not only significantly smaller and lighter, the smaller size is still a definite improvement over a smartphone. And on Android, you are just so much more free, you can use simple stuff like a file manager to get your stuff on and off the device. That’s the great thing about Android: In most cases, you’ll find a work around around stupid restrictions imposed on you by the manufacturer that is rather simple.